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20121101
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Search Results 0 to 13 of about 14 (some duplicates have been removed)
's in boston. j. mart, if you can hear me amid the hoopla here at the newseum. you're a student at virginia, you've been e-mailing me all night about problems you're detecting in virginia. tell us the problems you see and why and what it means. >> the margins in conservative -- [inaudible] in the suburbs around richmond, chesterfield county is the biggest one, comparable to '08. in 2008 john mccain lost the commonwealth of virginia by seven points. the bottom line, barack obama can do a little bit worse across virginia and still win that state. if he wins the state, there's no path to the presidency for mitt romney. we'll get the western suburbs, look at the outer suburbs of northern virginia, the margins are comparable or a little bit better for romney than they were for mccain four years ago. so unless something big happens in the two big jurisdictions still being counted, virginia beach and fairfax up by washington, d.c., i think that the commonwealth of virginia is going to stay blue and give president obama a second term. >> republicans knew that there was trouble there, or has this al
the transaction it time in half between washington and new york, as well as between new york and boston. they need to increase speed and updecorate the infrastructure is the ticket to transporting americans in an cost effective and energy efficient matter. we and labor are ak -- amtrak's partner. we -- if they so see the need but more importantly, the substantial amount of additional funds for amtrakings leagues. amtrak tray plays a role in financing our railroad retirement system. which is itself is funded pension that this committee and 2002 and 2001 reformed. changes in the federal treatment of amtrak suggest as -- such as significant funding cut or passenger rail privatization could jeopardize the solvent sei that effects railroad employees around the country. americans want a national inner city networking and amtrak is uniquely able to fill that need. highways and commercial aviation will not alone beat the nation's future transportation needs. the core nation of air and rail services should be mandated to free more air slots and provide timely rail services for shorter travel distances than
of california, and the ninth circuit, and right out of boston here, fantastic work -- 1 a glad, gay lesbian advocates and defenders, they are bringing the most effective cases against the so-called defense of marriage act and we will find out whether the supreme court will take up one or more or all of those cases and then we will have -- we should have a ruling by next june. so it is a big moment for marriage and marriage equality so it felt appropriate to write about this comment and i will talk about who i intended it for. the book is layout, imagined a conversation between me and someone who would probably describe themselves as reasonably tolerant of gay and lesbian people although tolerances and called it is cracked up to being if you haven't noticed. i have a friend who says the only thing one should have to tolerate as hemorrhoids. perhaps a little overstated, but if you have ever been on the receiving end of tolerance, it doesn't feel all that much better than in tolerance. if someone is begrudgingly admitting your right to exist, it doesn't feel all that warm and fuzzy, so i imagi
has enough money to hire a new assistant and he hires a promising young man from boston and he teaches them how to be a journalist and report about slavery and the great irony they would want to die in obscurity and he would go on to become the most famous abolitionist editor and one of the most influential american journalists of the 19th book, too. you probably think the only important thing that he did in his life is write the lyrics to the star spangled banner. he went into an interesting career in politics which is completely unknown to most people she was the modern washington character after he became famous in 1814 for writing the star spangled banner he did what people in washington usually do and he parlayed his fame into a lucrative practice and the political connection into jobs in the of the culmination of francis scott key's in 1833 when he was appointed to be the district attorney for the city of washington. what he did in that time i wouldn't say that was as significant as right in the star spangled banner which was obviously an enduring bet but it was really important.
in boston, it's anyone's choice, but it is that event in some ways that we go back to. now, james baldwin, i had great time writing this book, but i just wrote about the writers that just wanted to write about it, quoting them, end graphs, just using them for years until i finally decided i'm going to write about them and see what shape the book takes. baldwin, to me, is the most revealing. i'd always basically just quoted him, plucked passages as we all do. baldwin the essayist. baldwin, the nonfiction voice of the civil rights movement is something everyone should go back to revisit. in the collection, nobody knows my name, or in the collection, previous non-fiction collections or most famously, baldwin made himself the voice that was constantly, constantly asking why can't americans remember slavery? why don't they want to face their history with racism, why don't they want to look back at the emancipation process, why won't they look back at reconstruction? why won't they? he does it in the interview with baldwin, in the quick silver, you know, quick fire, quick method in appealing an un
called him -- [inaudible] now i love boston, and i went to school up there and high school there's a lot of smart people thereupon. i resented the fact that people in the north think that people in texas are deserving of terms like -- i don't know about you it kind of upsets me. because we do have people that, you know, are a little, you know, capable of doings things including the then president of the united states lyndon johnson. in a six week period kept the kennedy team because it was essential to be able to keep the momentum going on the agenda that stalled for three years, effectively. he kept the kennedy team which showed the leadership skills of humility. he the leadership skill of dogged determination to create and he the skills of creating a strategy. he implement ploymented in a six-week period a 25% across the board cut in income tabses. the idea was to cut taxes to raise revenue to going fund the great society programs. he went to the senate, which was oppose to the ultimately goal of, you know, significance civil rights legislation and convinced the dean of the senate, who
-- [inaudible] i love boston there a lot of smart people there. i resented the fact that people in the north think that people in texas are disperving of terms like -- [inaudible] i know about you but it upsets me. we have people that are a little capable of doing things including the then president of the united states lyndon johnson. in a six-week period kept the kennedy team because it was a essential to be able to keep the momentum going on the agenda that had stalled for three years effectively. he kept the kennedy team which showed the leadership kills humility. he the leadership skill of dogged determination to create and he had the skill of creating a strategy and implemented in aics-week period a 125% across the board cut in tax rates. believe it or not as a liberal democrat the idea was to cut taxes to raise rev now fund the great society program. he went to the senate, which was opposed to the ultimately goal of, you know, significant in the legislation and convince the dean of the senate, who was the budget chair that he would commit to a tbhawment year to year a decrees. not lik
and made her way to boston where she was a. the first statute to an american woman, a permit statue shutter with a hatchet in one hand and scalps in the other. >> hurricanes and he is now believed to be one of the costliest natural disasters with insured losses estimated to be as much as $20 billion. we discussed the national flood insurance program and how the insurance companies are responding to sandy with an industry representative. this is a half-hour. postcode let me introduce you to john prible, vice president of the independent insurance agents and brokers of america. our topic is the national insurance program. mr. purple, this article was in "the wall street journal" yesterday ensures market bubble tab. what's the responsibility when it comes to recovering from sandy? >> guest: sure, that article and a hand like really captures exactly what is going on. so when a typical insurance event for a hurricane, there's going to be damage caused by wind, wind storm damage, fallen trees. you see in the news media there's going to be fires or natural gas lines. all of this damage will be cov
that get america back to work in $300 billion in revenue with boston recession. it commits to spending levels for democrats and republicans agree to together. the fact of the matter is there's too much partisanship in d.c. this is an opportunity to come together and i'm disappointed by it upon it while sinai. >> host: we are going to turn it over to casey seiler nonprint questions from viewers at home. >> we've received a number of questions. as the party hurt, this is a time of great partisan division. @bruce tuchman who asks, in your time in politics, name one significant achievement was the result of working with a member of the opposite party appeared schriebman: i do situation where right leadership is going to zero to low-interest loan program for broadband. i thought that was a big mistake and i went and said we need this program here in upstate new york. it helps create jobs, health care delivery and education. they said we've made up our mind. we're going to zero this out. i said i'm going to bring an amendment to the florida house of representatives were going to overturn thi
takes command of the continental army he goes to boston and sees black men with guns and knows he's not going to build a self this to his brethren south carolina and georgia. he stops that. eventually he changed his mind when he needed more bodies and his army peer we always have to weigh these things. they are not black-and-white issues. he was a man of his time, part of the society utterly dependent on slavery and knew he was not going to change the minds of his fellow slaveholders. we point to these founding fathers and genuinely with admiration. but this was clearly where they did not see the great conflagration that was coming. how still out c. davis is the author on "in depth" on booktv on c-span 2. a better after we have with some questions have been preapproval shape as now. we have an hour and half program. we'll be right back. >> host: and we're back live with kenneth davis, author and historian in new york city. this is booktv on c-span 2. mr. davis come you say when it comes to your career, your writing career that she give a lot of credit to join davis. who is that? >
will have coverage of obama in chicago and mitt romney in boston. we are focused on some of the more competitive senate seats. plus, your reaction throughout the night by phone, e-mail, facebook, and twitter. live coverage begins at 8:00 p.m. eastern. next we take you to arizona for u.s. senate debate between republican jeff flake and democratic candidate richard carmona. they are vying for the senate seat left open by jon kyl. courtesy of kawc radio. >> welcome to the debate on the campus on school of arizona, yuma. we will begin with 92nd opening statements from jeff flake and trento. they will take questions from a panel of journalists related to life outside the metropolitan areas. built into the schedule is an additional four minutes, should the moderator or panelists have a follow-up. we have news director anna chaulk, joyce lobeck and michelle faust. joining us today are over 300 residents. they have agreed to respect the candidates and listened silently during the debate with the exception of right now. ladies and gentlemen, help me welcome congressman jeff flake and doctor r
of the continental army goes up to boston, sees that there are black men with guns and knows he is not going to be able to sell this to his brethren in south carolina and georgia. he stops that. eventually changes his mind when he needed more bodies in his army. we always have to weigh these things. they are not simple black-and-white issues. yes he was a man of his times, he was a man who was part of a society that was utterly dependent upon slavery and he knew he was not going to change the minds of his fellow slaveholders. we point to these founding fathers and genuinely with admiration, but this was clearly where they did not see the great conflagration that "don't know much about literature: what you need to know but never learned about great books and authors" >> host: kenneth davis is our guest. every offer we have on in depth we ask some questions of them and we are going to show use those now. we have an hour-and-a-half left in our program and we will be right back with your phone calls. >> host: we are live with kenneth davis, author and historian in new york city, this is booktv o
Search Results 0 to 13 of about 14 (some duplicates have been removed)